FITE STAIN, Nocardia sp., Artificial

Controls Slides Histopathology Fite Stain, Nocardia sp.

Nocardia sp. as procedural control for leprosy. (Not in human tissue.) Organisms artificially introduced into a rat organ (e.g., lung) through a non-infective process.

Tissue: 
(+) Rat Lung / (-) Lung
Adhesive or Charged Slides: 
Superfrost +

Product Options:

Part # 4215A10/Set $44.00
Part # 4215B98/Set $310.00

 

Nocardia sp. as procedural control for leprosy. (Not in human tissue.) Organisms artificially introduced into a rat organ (e.g., lung) through a non-infective process.

 

These quality control slides are intended to be used to verify histological techniques and reagent reactivity.  They are to be used for the qualitative purpose of determining positive or negative results, and are not intended to be used for any quantitative purpose.  The first serial section within this control box is stained and provided for your reference.  Store at 15-30°C in a light deprived and humidity controlled environment.

These Fite Stain, Nocardia sp., Artificial control slides are produced from animal tissues under carefully controlled conditions.  Reasonable measures are used to deliver quality control slides that are as consistent as possible.  However, characteristics of quality control slides may be dissimilar due to variations in the reagents, stains, techniques, laboratory conditions, and tissue sources used. At Newcomer Supply, we use a manual method of performing immunohistochemical and histopathology stains, specifically avoiding automation, in order to provide reactive control slides for even less aggressive methods of staining that our customers may be using.

Please note: A section of normal human lung has been included on the slide for use as a negative control.

 

METHOD:

Fixation:        10% Neutral Buffered Formalin

Technique:    Paraffin sections cut at approximately 5 microns

Solutions:      All solutions manufactured by Newcomer Supply 

 

COMPONENTS:

Xylene/Peanut Oil (2:1) Solution Catalog #1449
Carbol Fuchsin Stain Solution Catalog #1030
Sulfuric Acid 1% Aqueous Solution Catalog #14012
Methylene Blue, 0.5% Working Solution Catalog #12402

 

STAINING PROCEDURE:  Fite Stain for Acid Fast Organisms

  1. Filter Carbol Fuchsin Stain Solution. 
  2. Deparaffinize in Xylene/Peanut Oil (2:1) Solution, two changes, for 12 minutes each.
  3. Drain, wipe off excess oil, blot to opacity.  Blot well to remove residual oil.
  4. Stain slides in Carbol Fuchsin Stain Solution for 30 minutes at room temperature.
  5. Wash in running tap water for 3 minutes.
  6. Decolorize slides individually in Sulfuric Acid, 1% Aqueous Solution until sections are faint pink. This will take about one minute.
  7. Wash in running tap water for 3 minutes.
  8. Counterstain lightly with Methylene Blue, 0.5% Working Solution for 5-10 seconds.
  9. Rinse off excess counterstain in running tap water.  Background should be a light sky blue.
  10. Blot and let stand for a few minutes to air-dry thoroughly.
  11. Dip slides in xylene and coverslip with a compatible mounting medium.

 

RESULTS:     

Acid-fast bacilli & Leprae bacilli Red
Nocardia sp Red*
Red blood cells Yellow-orange
Other tissue elements Pale blue
Normal Human Lung Negative

* A percentage of the organisms may resist taking the red stain & remain blue depending on the growth phase of the individual organisms.

 

PROCEDURE NOTES:

  1. It is important not to over-counterstain with Methylene Blue Stain Solution, as the organisms may be masked.  Check microscopically before air drying. If overstained, remove Methylene Blue Stain Solution with dilute acid solution, rinse thoroughly, then repeat counterstain step with a shorter interval.   
  2. If tap water is generally acid in pH, the counterstain may be pale.  Adjust staining time.
  3. Acid fastness of the leprosy organisms is enhanced when the waxy capsule is protected by the mixture of Xylene/Peanut Oil and the avoidance of dehydrating solutions.

 

REFERENCES:

  1.  “Histopathological Methods and Color Atlas of Special Stains and Tissue Artifacts”, 1992, Luna, Lee, Johnson Printers, Downers Grove, Illinois, 1992, pp. 180-181.
  2. Histotechnology: a Self-Instructional Text” 1990, Sheehan, D., and Hrapchak, B., 2nd edition, Batelle Press, Columbus and Richland, p. 237
  3. Theory and Practice of Histotechnology”, 1980, Sheehan, D., and Hrapchak, B., 2nd edition, Batelle Press, Columbus and Richland, p. 237.